Author Archives: J.P. Van Alstyne

Effective Supplements, Productivity, Aerobic Capacity

What is the best way to get all your vitamins and minerals? A nutrient dense diet or supplementation? 

Hopefully this is a no-brainer but just to be clear it’s more important to have a nutrient dense diet and use supplements to mitigate any dietary deficiencies.

 

For example…

When I was training for my 50-mile trail run at Bear Mountain, NY I was solely dedicated to covering mileage and eating super clean. This worked for awhile but burnout became inevitable. I cut my mileage in half during the week and looked towards taking supplements that what speed up recovery and increase focus. 

 

I took a combination of fish oil, adaptogens and vitamin C two months prior to running the race and felt a substantial increase in aerobic capacity and motivation towards training. The most exciting part was that I became more productive at F.A.S. Training. Similar to the Energizer Bunny. To this day I still take these supplements for two months at a time with two months off. 

 

Fish Oil 

Nordic Naturals – Omega-3, Cognition, Heart Health, and Immune Support, 120 Soft Gels

Has shown to:

-decrease anxiety caused by daily stress and training

-prolong endurance during exercise

-decrease cortisol, a catabolic hormone that can be raised due to stress and training

-anti-oxidant, which prevents the breakdown of cells in the body

 

Adaptogens 

Pure Encapsulations – Energy Xtra – Energy-Promoting Adaptogen Formula* – 60 Capsules

This product has a potent blend of adaptogens that enhance stamina and reduce fatigue. It contains ashwagandha, Asian ginseng, eleuthero and rhodiola which all have shown to help the body adapt to stress. This is by far my favorite mix of energy boosting supplements that help my productivity at work and aerobic capacity during training. It’s not a stimulant either so it won’t give you a crash or make you feel jittery.

 

Vitamin C

Thorne Research – Vitamin C w/ Flavonoids – Pure Ascorbic Acid Supplement with Citrus Bioflavonoids (Rutin, Hesperidin, and Quercetin) – 180 Capsules

Has shown to:

-decrease muscle damage and soreness from training

-decrease fatigue in conjunction with exercise

-preservation of bone mineral density

-aids in the absorption of iron and creation of red blood cells

 

How and when do I take these? 

Take the prescribed amount written on the each label 30 minutes after eating breakfast.

 

J.P. Van Alstyne
Head Strength Coach at F.A.S. Training Inc.
J.P. has his Bachelor of Science degree from University of Rhode Island where he primarily focused on exercise science and sports nutrition. He is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist by The National Strength and Conditioning Association. His athletic background ranges from high school track and field to collegiate rugby where he was the URI Men’s Rugby Captain.



He has trained many different clients ranging from youth athletes, Division 1 athletes, amputees, military personnel and fitness enthusiasts. He has mentored under Dr. Frank Welling training philosophies at F.A.S. Training Inc. and now is full-time strength coach. He has also shadowed physical therapists and has been to multiple seminars to stay in touch with the evolving fitness industry. His main goal in training others is to give them an advantage among others in work capacity, mental toughness, nutrition and how to apply it to every aspect of life.



J.P. strongly believes that knowledge is gained from experience and to truly master something you must live it. Living by this code he has competed in multiple races such as The Toughmudder, Spartan Beast, GoRuck Challenge, 50 Mile Gore-Tex North Face Endurance Trail Run, Rev3 26hour Adventure Race in the Shenandoah Mountains, NYC East River Swim and trekked Mt. Elbert (14,439), Colorado in December during a blizzard.

For High-Octane Performance Follow The 6/1 Rule

 

Eating healthy seven days of the week is ideal but can also be a recipe for breakdown. Nobody’s perfect, and eating healthy around the clock can make you feel overwhelmed.

 

It’s easier to eat healthy six days a week and will still have an impact on body composition and performance. If you pick one day to splurge this will help prevent getting derailed. Also, after eating healthy for six days you might find that your favorite treats aren’t so good anymore.

 

TO FUEL UP CHOW ON THESE FOODS

 

[two_column_block style=”1″] [content1]

SIX DAYS A WEEK

As much as you want:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Natural nut butters
  • Lean jerky
  • Coconut oil and extra virgin olive oil
  • Lentils
  • Whole grains, oatmeal, quinoa, amaranth, brown rice
  • Whole Eggs
  • Fish, mackerel, salmon
  • Greek yogurt
  • Lean meat, chicken, beef and pork
  • Unprocessed nuts

[/content1] [content2]

ONE DAY A WEEK

Not so often:

  • Fast food
  • Chips
  • Deep fried food
  • Soda
  • Bacon
  • Sugary cereals
  • Alcohol
  • Backed goods high in sugar
  • Cheese
  • Ice cream
  • Candy bars
  • Juice high in sugar

[/content2] [/two_column_block]

 

10 CONDITIONING TIPS

 

Use this list to ensure you stay strong and fast all game long. Don’t ride the bench! Get in shape now!

 

  • PERFORM FARMERS WALK BEFORE YOU RUN

Walk 30-40 yards while holding heavy Kettle Bells at your sides. Make sure to maintain good posture. Set them down and sprint back to the beginning, then walk back to Kettle Bells. Complete 4 sets with 60 seconds rest.

  • RUN FASTER, FOR A LONGER DISTANCE

To improve speed complete 300 yard shuttle sprints. Start in a two-point stance, sprint 50 yards and back three times. Complete 3-4 sets with 60 seconds rest.

 

  • WALK INTERVALS

On a track sprint the straights and walk the turns. Complete 12-24 sprints with the turns as your recovery.

  • DOMINATE HILLS

Perform hill sprints to develop power endurance. Run up a steep hill for 10-15 seconds and walk back down. Complete 10-12 sprints with the walk down as your recovery.

  • SPORTS-SPECIFIC RUNNING DISTANCE/TIME

Match the running time or distance of your sport. Sprint and rest the same amount as your sport demands. If your sport requires a stick or ball use it!

  • RESISTED SPRINTS TO BUILD POWER ENDURANCE

Wearing a harness attach a band or sled and sprint for 15 yards. Make sure to use a load that allows a max sprint while maintaining correct form. Complete 5 sets with 60 seconds rest.

  • BECOME A BEAR

On a field perform Bear Crawls to increase full body muscular endurance. Bear Crawl as quickly as possible without galloping for 50 yards then jog back to start. Complete 6 sets with the jog as your recovery.

  • TRAIL RUN

Get off the road and into the trail. The changing terrain functions as natural intervals and can help foot work. Be vigilant on your trail run, the last thing you need is a busted ankle!

  • MAX EFFORT ROWING TO INCREASE ANAEROBIC POWER

Row 500 meters as quickly as you can with damper setting at 3-5. A good time is between 1:30 to 1:40.

  • GET A TRACK ON YOUR HEART RATE

Wear a heart rate monitor during conditioning sessions to see if you are in the correct zone. For endurance training you should be around 80 percent of your heart rate max. For high-intensity intervals and sports specific conditioning you should be at 85-90 percent.

 

 

 

Created by: J.P. Van Alstyne, CSCS

Do You Have Good or Bad Stress?

We all know how stress can feel. Sometimes it can cloak our ambitions or drive us to success. In general there are two types of stress, good and bad, that influence our decisions and sometimes control our lives. If you can learn how to mitigate bad stress and capture good stress, training and life will be more manageable.

 

Good Stress (Eustress) 

  • pushes you out of your comfort zone for a positive outcome
  • short-lived
  • inspirational
  • connected with life experiences
  • pulls you out of a slump

An example could be completing your first one hour training session at FAS! You feel nervous and anxious prior to training but after feel refreshed and exhilarated.

 

Bad Stress (Distress) 

  • last too long
  • negative and demoralizing
  • de-motivating
  • leaves you feeling worse
  • chronic

Have you ever been pulled in so many directions at work, school or home that you eventually snap? This is bad stress and can be controlled by lessening our allostatic load.

 

Allostatic load 

The cumulative total of stuff that causes us stress mentally and physically. (Precision Nutrtion) 

Here is a good scenario of a large allostatic load:

Your drive to work in traffic, get a flat tire, now you are late for a very important meeting, your significant other calls complaining about something pointless and your taxes are due by midnight. 

We have all been there! If you haven’t already snapped it won’t take much more for it to happen.

Allostatic load can also be related to training sessions, check out the chart…

Stress

 

What to do now…

It is important to have enough good stress to stay motivated but not so much to were we “freak out”. You need to find a sweet spot or optimal zone were you only benefit from good stress. This is different for everyone because we all have different allostatic loads.

To manage stress: 

  • try and balance life demands, exercise, nutrition and workload
  • make responsibilites goal-oriented, achieve small challenges to reach the overall goal
  • create a routine
  • know how much stress you can take

To manage allostatic load:

  • get sunshine
  • breathing techniques
  • exercise and nutrition
  • putting aside a time everyday for yourself
  • reading an interesting book or article
  • laugh regularly

 

 

http://www.precisionnutrition.com/good-stress-bad-stress

By Krista Scott-Dixon and Brian St. Pierre

Detox vs Eating Healthy

We should all know that consistently eating healthy versus doing a detox every so often is the winner in this argument. But I would like to also argue that doing a “detox” can be the best way to approach healthy eating.

 

What is a detox?

-A detox is a period of time that you actively try and rid the body of toxins by following a usually pain-staking diet. Detox diets generally consist of an eating plan that requires you to avoid all processes sugary foods and drink a lot of filter water. (Shouldn’t we do this all the time?!) They all have their little gimmicks to make you believe this is the magical fat loss, energy boosting formula.

 

The problems with a detox is that most results are highly variable, the diet plans are not subjective and are sometimes so hard people can make it through the first three days. Most of the oxidative stress has already damaged your body, making a hardcore detox pointless.  Another issue is if you search detox on Google about 67,400,000 results show up. Where do we even start?!

 

What to do now… start a detox. WHAT?! (Actually we like to call it a diet overhaul)

Sometimes the best way to start eating healthy is to begin a detox, or diet overhaul. This will give you the feeling of a “fresh start”. Then, slowly introduce whole healthy foods back into your routine. You might be very surprised on how you react to certain foods.

 

The main point we are trying to get across is that you can use a detox as a tool to get you jump started into routine healthy eating habits. The worst thing you can do is do a detox once a month and yo-yo back into unhealthy eating habits.

 

Please Contact us if you would like more information… Contact Us

Embrace The Pain

“Pain is always a signal that your body is trying to get your brain to pay attention to something. The trick is to distinguish between pain that’s dangerous and pain that just comes with pushing your body to the limit.” 

-Carrie Cheadle, a sports psychologist and author of On Top of Your Game

F.A.S. Training

Change your perception of pain to increase your tolerance using these mental tools. 

Accept the pain. Stop avoiding it or fearing it – accept that it’s part of training and it only lasts a moment. Write a list of things you hate and love about training. Look at the two sides and ask yourself if you can accept the things you hate for the things you love.

Have a specific goal. It’s worth saying that you want to get into shape or lose weight but it’s important to be specific goal. Make a list of small goals that will get you to the final goal.

Relax! Psychological tension leads to muscular tension. Notice your posture when your nervous or stressed, there are major muscle group that stay flexed and tense. Find a mantra that helps you to relax or have a pre-training ritual.

Plan your response to critical moments. Think of parts of your training that might not go perfectly such as certain exercise or routines and plan a behavior around that moment.

 

J.P. Van Alstyne
Head Strength Coach at F.A.S. Training Inc.
J.P. has his Bachelor of Science degree from University of Rhode Island where he primarily focused on exercise science and sports nutrition. He is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist by The National Strength and Conditioning Association. His athletic background ranges from high school track and field to collegiate rugby where he was the URI Men’s Rugby Captain.



He has trained many different clients ranging from youth athletes, Division 1 athletes, amputees, military personnel and fitness enthusiasts. He has mentored under Dr. Frank Welling training philosophies at F.A.S. Training Inc. and now is full-time strength coach. He has also shadowed physical therapists and has been to multiple seminars to stay in touch with the evolving fitness industry. His main goal in training others is to give them an advantage among others in work capacity, mental toughness, nutrition and how to apply it to every aspect of life.



J.P. strongly believes that knowledge is gained from experience and to truly master something you must live it. Living by this code he has competed in multiple races such as The Toughmudder, Spartan Beast, GoRuck Challenge, 50 Mile Gore-Tex North Face Endurance Trail Run, Rev3 26hour Adventure Race in the Shenandoah Mountains, NYC East River Swim and trekked Mt. Elbert (14,439), Colorado in December during a blizzard.

 

Jene Shaw. “Embrace The Pain” Trathlete Magazine October 2015: 28. 

Eliminating Holiday Water Weight

The key is sodium control.

To really enjoy the holidays it’s nice to be able to eat whatever you would like. Right!?

I don’t know about everyone else but when it comes to holiday meals nothing holds me back. I take it farther than just a cheat meal, I eat like a bear getting ready for winter. Once and awhile it’s all fine and dandy and we can get away with these meals every so often. But what if you find yourself eating like this every weekend for the whole month of December?

Don’t worry your not screwed you just have to focus during the week and go ahead and binge on the weekends, but only for December.

I put together a mock meal that is literally straight out of a food store and similar to what a holiday meal consists of. The focus is the amount of sodium consumed in only one sitting.

Food Serving Size Sodium
Roast Turkey Gravy Mix 1/4 cup 340 mg
Whole Berry Cranberry Sauce 2 tablespoons 5 mg
Stove Top Turkey Stuffing Mix 1/2 cup 420 mg
Frozen Corn 1/4 cup
Green Bean Casserole made with Cream of Mushroom Soup 1/2 cup 353 mg
Mash potatoes made with butter and milk 1/2 cup 315 mg
Roast Turkey Breast 2 slices about 300 grams 47 mg
Dinner Roll 152 mg
Pumpkin Pie 1/8 of 10 inch pie 260 mg
Light whipped cream 2 tablespoons 5 mg
GRAND TOTAL 1897 mg*

*This does not include the addition of condiments and don’t forget alcohol consumption.

The Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for sodium is roughly 2400mg

A holiday MEAL can have up 1897mg of sodium (above) almost your whole allowance for the day!!

 

I followed a strict diet and exercise plan after Thanksgiving  and have managed my weight very well.

Morning of Thanksgiving: 221 lbs

Morning after: 232 lbs

After 1 week of training: 219 lbs

Check it out Holiday Water Weight Managment

What’s With All The Jump Rope?

Jumping rope should be the most consistent component to all training programs. If you walk into a training facility and notice that everyone is jumping rope like Ali then your probably at the right place. Rope work, as we like to call it, produces some of the most important physical and mental attributes such as:

Improved foot speed

Improved cardio efficiency

Improved balance

Improved Posture

Increase work capacity (next week we will explain this)

Enhanced motor skills

Improved lower body joint integrity

Reduction of body fat

Timing and Focus

 

Cool fact from Buddy Lee:

Jump rope for 10 minutes at the rate of 120 turns/min. burns 120 calories (based on a 150lb. person) and provides the same cardiovascular fitness as:

Swimming 12 minutes

Running 1 mile in 12 minutes

Tennis 2 sets

Jogging 30 minutes

Fall Asleep Faster Naturally

How often do you come home from work and just can’t slow your head down? It’s almost like your brain is strapped to stability ball that is being kicked by the most hyped up 12 year old. Then, when it’s time to fall asleep the kid decides to invite his friends over to kick your brain which is still strapped to that big green stability ball.

Most people deal with this on a daily basis and turn to substances and methods that force them to deviate from a healthy lifestyle. For example: drinking alcohol in excess, taking sleep aids, and gorging on sugary foods.

 

JP Sleeping

 

#1 Two hours before bed shut off anything with a screen. This includes TV, Cell phones, Tablets, etc. Dr Guy Meadows, clinical director of The Sleep School, a West London clinic, says: ‘We’re designed to sleep in the dark. When the sun comes up, the light receptors in the retina at the back of the eye tell us it’s time to wake up by inhibiting the release of melatonin, the hormone that makes us sleepy. The reverse happens at night, so it’s ideal to dim down the lights as bedtime approaches as sleep is vital for the regulation of our mood.” So next time your good friend or loved one is cranky the next morning ask them, “Did you fall asleep with the TV on again?” If you need to leave your cell phone on for an alarm make sure it’s on airplane mode and at least plugged in on the other side of the room. 

 

#2 Create a routine before bed to adjust your body for sleep. This can include meditating, breathing techniques or having a quite study. Your body will eventually recognize the routine which can help in releasing sleep hormones such as melatonin.

Try this breathing exercise to help alleviate anxiety and relax.

Breathe into your belly 4 sec.

Hold your breath 4 sec.

Relax shoulders and slowly exhale.

Repeat as needed.

 

#3 Read something boring. Yes, it sounds strange but it works. I pulled out my old econ 101 book and it put me to sleep in about 40 seconds. Make sure the TV is off and your cell phone is put away for the night. 

 

#4 Eat a couple of hours before bed. Don’t eat too much and make sure it’s nutrient dense. Also try not to have a lot of fluids. This will prevent frequent bathroom trips that can interrupt sleep. The overall amount of sleep is important but uninterrupted sleep has a much higher value.

 

#5 Don’t delay bedtime, just go to bed already! It’s Thursday night and the weekend has pretty much started. Or so we think. There are numerous occasions that we fool ourselves in staying up later to fulfill what we enjoy. Ask yourself this, will starting the weekend on Thursday really make me happier? HELL NO! So, next time your favorite show is on until midnight or a couple of friends are heading to the local pub JUST SAY NO!

 

 

 

J.P. Van Alstyne
Head Strength Coach at F.A.S. Training Inc.
J.P. has his Bachelor of Science degree from University of Rhode Island where he primarily focused on exercise science and sports nutrition. He is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist by The National Strength and Conditioning Association. His athletic background ranges from high school track and field to collegiate rugby where he was the URI Men’s Rugby Captain.



He has trained many different clients ranging from youth athletes, Division 1 athletes, amputees, military personnel and fitness enthusiasts. He has mentored under Dr. Frank Welling training philosophies at F.A.S. Training Inc. and now is full-time strength coach. He has also shadowed physical therapists and has been to multiple seminars to stay in touch with the evolving fitness industry. His main goal in training others is to give them an advantage among others in work capacity, mental toughness, nutrition and how to apply it to every aspect of life.



J.P. strongly believes that knowledge is gained from experience and to truly master something you must live it. Living by this code he has competed in multiple races such as The Toughmudder, Spartan Beast, GoRuck Challenge, 50 Mile Gore-Tex North Face Endurance Trail Run, Rev3 26hour Adventure Race in the Shenandoah Mountains, NYC East River Swim and trekked Mt. Elbert (14,439), Colorado in December during a blizzard.

 

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