10 CONDITIONING TIPS

 

Use this list to ensure you stay strong and fast all game long. Don’t ride the bench! Get in shape now!

 

  • PERFORM FARMERS WALK BEFORE YOU RUN

Walk 30-40 yards while holding heavy Kettle Bells at your sides. Make sure to maintain good posture. Set them down and sprint back to the beginning, then walk back to Kettle Bells. Complete 4 sets with 60 seconds rest.

  • RUN FASTER, FOR A LONGER DISTANCE

To improve speed complete 300 yard shuttle sprints. Start in a two-point stance, sprint 50 yards and back three times. Complete 3-4 sets with 60 seconds rest.

 

  • WALK INTERVALS

On a track sprint the straights and walk the turns. Complete 12-24 sprints with the turns as your recovery.

  • DOMINATE HILLS

Perform hill sprints to develop power endurance. Run up a steep hill for 10-15 seconds and walk back down. Complete 10-12 sprints with the walk down as your recovery.

  • SPORTS-SPECIFIC RUNNING DISTANCE/TIME

Match the running time or distance of your sport. Sprint and rest the same amount as your sport demands. If your sport requires a stick or ball use it!

  • RESISTED SPRINTS TO BUILD POWER ENDURANCE

Wearing a harness attach a band or sled and sprint for 15 yards. Make sure to use a load that allows a max sprint while maintaining correct form. Complete 5 sets with 60 seconds rest.

  • BECOME A BEAR

On a field perform Bear Crawls to increase full body muscular endurance. Bear Crawl as quickly as possible without galloping for 50 yards then jog back to start. Complete 6 sets with the jog as your recovery.

  • TRAIL RUN

Get off the road and into the trail. The changing terrain functions as natural intervals and can help foot work. Be vigilant on your trail run, the last thing you need is a busted ankle!

  • MAX EFFORT ROWING TO INCREASE ANAEROBIC POWER

Row 500 meters as quickly as you can with damper setting at 3-5. A good time is between 1:30 to 1:40.

  • GET A TRACK ON YOUR HEART RATE

Wear a heart rate monitor during conditioning sessions to see if you are in the correct zone. For endurance training you should be around 80 percent of your heart rate max. For high-intensity intervals and sports specific conditioning you should be at 85-90 percent.

 

 

 

Created by: J.P. Van Alstyne, CSCS

J.P. Van Alstyne
Head Strength Coach at F.A.S. Training Inc.
J.P. has his Bachelor of Science degree from University of Rhode Island where he primarily focused on exercise science and sports nutrition. He is also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist by The National Strength and Conditioning Association. His athletic background ranges from high school track and field to collegiate rugby where he was the URI Men’s Rugby Captain.



He has trained many different clients ranging from youth athletes, Division 1 athletes, amputees, military personnel and fitness enthusiasts. He has mentored under Dr. Frank Welling training philosophies at F.A.S. Training Inc. and now is full-time strength coach. He has also shadowed physical therapists and has been to multiple seminars to stay in touch with the evolving fitness industry. His main goal in training others is to give them an advantage among others in work capacity, mental toughness, nutrition and how to apply it to every aspect of life.



J.P. strongly believes that knowledge is gained from experience and to truly master something you must live it. Living by this code he has competed in multiple races such as The Toughmudder, Spartan Beast, GoRuck Challenge, 50 Mile Gore-Tex North Face Endurance Trail Run, Rev3 26hour Adventure Race in the Shenandoah Mountains, NYC East River Swim and trekked Mt. Elbert (14,439), Colorado in December during a blizzard.

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